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MLE 5110 - Principles and Procedures

in the Middle Level School

Summer 2004

"Soften your words, toughen your heart, and TEACH, TEACH, TEACH like there is no tomorrow!" --Tron Young

Professor:                 Dr. Richard A. NeSmith

Office:                      2203 Buzzard Hall

Office Phone:           (217) 581-7882            Fax: (217) 581-6300

E-mail:                      BioScience_Ed@yahoo.com  (note there is an underscore between words 

School E-mail:          cfran@eiu.edu

Web page:                 http://nesmith2.tripod.com

Office Hours:           Friday, 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. (or by appointment and at other times as you can catch me in my office)

I. Course Description

Definition and rationale for middle level education, historical development components of the middle school, curriculum and organizational patterns, teacher's role in middle-level education, and planning for instruction. This course partially fulfills the ISBE requirements for middle-level endorsement. (graduate level; 3 credits).

II. Purpose of the Course

To study and principles and procedures that make up the middle level environment/community. The student will understand the developmentally appropriate driving nature of  the middle level movement and how it relates to contemporary events. Emphasis is on the developmental nature of the middle grade student, both academically, as well as socially and intellectually. Students will demonstrate comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation, in their individual and collaborative efforts of learning the middle school principles, procedures, philosophy, and concepts.

This course is primarily performance-based. The assignments are thoughtfully assigned and carefully spelled out and will require much of your time during the next few weeks. The reward is that most of your knowledge will be self-obtained and therefore far more brain-based in that you will have greater mental access to what you have learned, shared, and heard, than if it were of a more content, test-based unit. In essence, we will each be teaching the other and our personal interests and experiences will act as links to the information shared. It is expected that you will give 110% percent to all assignments, collaborations, and readings allocated, herein.

III. Instructional Objectives

This course has been planned with three objectives in mind:

1. To enhance the student's knowledge and understanding of the historical context of the Middle School movement. This involves reading useful and scholarly journals and text, as well as synthesizing this information into a presentable and convincing fashion.

2. To help the student develop an ability to critically analyze information and common assumptions about middle school curriculum and education.

3. To be able to collect data and think critically, by understanding the philosophy and methods through which middle school pedagogy has evolved.

4. To provide opportunities for the student to apply information about middle level teaching and pedagogy, in light of their own personal, and/or professional experiences in middle school classrooms.

IV. Performance Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:


1. Identify and describe resources on which early childhood/elementary level science education is currently based.


2. Identify, describe, and develop science experiences that are based on prescribed state and national standards.

 

3. Understand and apply the concepts necessary to plan a science learning environment appropriate for discovery and creative use of pre-operational/formal operational children.


4. Understand the nature of scientific inquiry, its central role in science, and how to use the skills and processes of scientific inquiry.

V. Dispositions:

Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:

1. Display confidence in their understanding and analytical abilities regarding the principles and procedures pertinent to Middle Level Education..

2. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of sharing their research findings in small and large groups, and in the creation and presentation of a multimedia lesson.

3. Recognize, address, and adapt for variation in students' skills, learning styles, multiple intelligence, etc.

VI. Course Outline

1. Physical and Intellectual Development: Ten to Fourteen Years of Age

2. Home, Community and the Middle School

3. Comparison Between the Traditional Junior High School and The Middle School

 

4. History of the Middle School

5. Middle School Teaming: An Instructional and Interdisciplinary Approach

6. The Teacher's Role in the Middle School

 

7. Curriculum Integration, Exploratory Curriculum and Assessment in the Middle School

8. Cooperative Learning in the Middle School

9. The Use of Classroom Centers to Provide On-level Work for Students in the Middle School

 

10. The Effects of Turning Point 2000 on Middle Level Education

11. The Importance of School and Classroom Environment in the Middle School Concept of Education

12. Classroom Management, Discipline and Punishment in the Middle School

 

13. Drugs and Violence in the Middle School

14. Grouping and Tracking in the Middle School

15. Middle Grade Teacher Advisory System and the Exploratory Concept

 

16. The Middle School and Parental Involvement

17. Classroom Assessment and State Standards for the Middle School

VII. Communications

1.  I am very accessible through e-mail, and check e-mails numerous times per day. This is the easiest and quickest means to get a question answered or some concept or requirement clarified. Use it to stay in touch.

2. A great deal of information is made available exclusively by e-mail. It is the student's responsibility to check their e-mail several times per week. Updates, changes in assignments, corrections, deadlines, announcements, etc. will be made known to the student in this manner and the student, therefore, will be held to any notifications made via e-mail.

VII. Instructional Procedures, Assignments, and Grading

A. Policy

1. Instructional procedures will include lectures, group work, individual projects/reports, class discussions, literature research, various media, and/or classroom presentations. Each student is responsible for his or her own learning, and each student is expected to take ownership of each assignment, being creative and innovative, and demonstrating graduate level work. The instructor will provide adequate parameters for assignments. If/when parameters are not given, the student is expected to perform at the level of a professional.

2. Disability - If any student has a documented disability which may affect your performance in this class, and wish to receive academic accommodations, please notify the Coordinator of the Office of Disability Services (581-6583) immediately. Waiting until an evaluation or other assessment is due will not be considered adequate notification and no accommodations will be made at that time.

3. Plagiarism - Each student is expected to do his/her own work. Any plagiarism will result in receiving a zero (0 points) for the assignment in question, which will result in a lower grade for the course, as well as a written recommendation to the Dean for expulsion. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, copying another student's answers, papers, or projects, including material in a report without giving due credit to the source of origin, "cutting and pasting" from the Internet, or securing assignments from Internet "paper mills". Keep in mind that if it appears that you are taking credit for work that is not yours, you are plagiarizing, and that is the crime of stealing.

4. Attendance - Attendance is required at all scheduled class sessions. If you must miss a class, you must notify me at 581-7882 ASAP. This will be considered an "excused" absence of which 1 excused absence is permitted per semester (according to the Dean, an excused absence includes: verification of sickness, death of immediate family, or other reasons approved by the administration). Failure to provide notification on or before the day of the absence will result automatically in an "unexcused" absence. Each unexcused absence will result in a loss of 3 points from your attendance/participation grade. Those who accumulate more than three unexcused classes will be asked to withdraw from the course. If a problem occurs, please see the instructor before you over-absent the course.

Students missing class on the day of their scheduled lesson are not guaranteed an opportunity to make up the missed time, and may even be required to teach to a different class during a different time slot (if any such arrangement exists).

5. Tardiness - In the field of education, being tardy for work is not acceptable, and in fact, can be downright dangerous for students. However, 1 tardy will be allowed. Each additional tardy will result in a loss of 2 points from your grade.

6. All work to be turned in should be proofread and typed. See the criteria for reports on the title page.

7. Online component -  I will be available online every Tuesday night from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. at http://bioscience.tripod.com/chat.htm. This is a private chat room, so you may sign in using your real name. Check in and give me an update on how you are doing.

8. Extensions - There are times when unexpected events may appear in your life that cause such undue stress as to completely interfere with your studies. If such an event occurs, then feel free to see me personally. I do not like to give extensions, but I do believe in being fair. Each and every case will be considered individually. Do not ask me for an extension on the day an assignment is due!

B. Semester Assignments: All of the following written assignments require the proper title page format. All papers should be typed, double-spaced, 12-13 font, either Times Roman or Arial, with 1 inch margins on all sides. Avoid using colloquialism or contractions. This is in checklist form for your convenience!

______1. Reading of the textbook. The Nike plan: Just do it! You will report the number of pages you have read.

______2. Online Component. This course specified in the course catalog an online component (for Tuesday nights). The night you choose is actually inconsequential. That you complete the online component (noted in the class schedule as modules) is essential in providing you with additional training, concepts, and "food for thought" as a professional teacher in the middle school. These components are "mini-lessons" which provide lecture/discussion incorporated with PowerPoint presentations of topics that are important but not fully discussed in class due to the time factor, or are provided as a means of review. As you view these, you might also consider how you would set up such a program of components to help remediate your own students. During this online component there will be various short reading assignments, as well. Complete any assignments made in the online lessons and be prepared to discuss these in class.

______3. Report and Presentation of Middle School Research. A 30 min. presentation of your research report/findings, 1) using multimedia, 2) providing student handouts, 3) sharing applications for the middle school, 4) use adequate resources/ references. (5-10 page report; have an extra copy for the instructor and a summary page for your colleagues). Feel free to be imaginative in your presentation. Teach us! See rubric for presentation.

Note: Research paper and PowerPoint presentation (if used) should be turned in on or before the night as the presentation is made for full credit. These should be e-mailed.

 

______4. Middle School Improvement Plan (quasi-research). Develop a school improvement paper in which you have gleamed from your textbook principles and procedures which have shown to be effective in helping students learn, teachers teach, and schools to thrive as a learning community. (4-6 pages, excluding title page and bibliography).

 

______5. Internet Research.

    A. Read, reflect and write a response paper about two Internet articles regarding issues in Middle Level Education. Be ready to share your findings in class (1 page or less for each). Articles should be submitted with your paper.

 

6. Journal Articles - articles from an academic periodical

    ______A. Read, reflect and write a response paper about one journal article regarding developmentally responsive school curriculum in Middle Level Education. Be ready to share your findings in class (1-2 pages). Articles should be submitted with your paper.

 

    ______B. Read, reflect and write a response paper about one journal article regarding the pros/cons of the Middle School Exploratory concept. Be ready to share your findings in class (1-2 pages). Articles should be submitted with your paper.

C. Notebook (Items to download)

D. Grading Criteria: Total = 100 pts.

ITEMS
total point value
1. Attendance/attitude/punctuality/participation
15
2. Reading the Textbook: Chapters 1-10

10

3. Middle School Report & Presentation
25
4. Middle School Improvement Plan

15

5. Two Internet Research Articles

7

6. Online Component

10

7. Journal Article A
9
8. Journal Article B
9
TOTAL POINTS

100

                   

E. Grading scale:

91% 100%    =   A
82%  - 90%      =   B
73% 81%    =     C
64% 72%    =     D
63% or below   =   F

F. Tentative Schedule - (It is quite likely that we will alter the pace and/or the sequence of these topics as the semester progresses.) This is to WARN you of the likelihood of this taking place and ask that you not complain when it occurs. J

Week

*Textbook Readings (should be be completed before class)

*Online Modules (may be completed after the scheduled class)

Class Meeting

Items Due

June 11 - 5-8:30 pm.

 

Have Chapters 1 & 2 read prior to June 11

Syllabus /  Middle Level Schools

Research agenda

Work on your middle school research.

 

 

 

 

June 12 - 8:30 am-noon

Module 1

Young Adolescents & Learning

Research agenda

#5. Internet Research A. due

 

 

 

 

June 18 - 5-8:30 pm.

Read Chapters 3 & 4

 

 

Reading Assignment 1

Presentation 1: Physical and Intellectual Development: Ten to Fourteen Years of Age

Presentation 2: Home, Community and the Middle School

Presentation 3: Comparison Between the Traditional Junior High School and The Middle School

Presentation 4: History of the Middle School

#6. Journal Articles A. due

 

 

 

 

June 19 - 8:30 am-noon

Read Chapters 5 & 6

Module 2

 

Reading Assignment 2

Presentation 5: Middle School Teaming: An Instructional and Interdisciplinary Approach

Presentation 6:. The Teacher's Role in the Middle School

Presentation 7: Curriculum Integration, Exploratory Curriculum and Assessment in the Middle School

Presentation 8: Cooperative Learning in the Middle School

#6. Journal Articles B. due

 

 

 

 

June 25 - 5-8:30 pm.

Read Chapters 7 & 8

 

 

Presentation 9: The Use of Classroom Centers to Provide On-level Work for Students in the Middle School

Presentation 10: The Effects of Turning Point 2000 on Middle Level Education

Presentation 11: The Importance of School and Classroom in the Environment of the Middle School Concept 

 

Two Internet Article Response Papers due

 

 

 

 

 

June 26 - 8:30 am-noon

Read Chapter 9-10

Module 3

Presentation 12: Drugs, Violence, and Crime in the Middle School

Presentation 13: Grouping and Tracking in the Middle School

Presentation 14: Middle School Teacher Advisory System and the Exploratory Concept

Presentation 15: The Middle School and Parental Involvement

"Reading of the Textbook" form due at class.

#4. Middle school improvement paper due by 6/26, 12 midnight!

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Presentation 16: Classroom Assessment and State Standards for the Middle School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rostered Presentations:

Presentation 1: Physical and Intellectual Development: Ten to Fourteen 
      Years of Age
	COBURN LISA A         
	COSTELLO SHANNON R 
 
Presentation 2: Home, 
      Community and the Middle School   
	CROME MARY ANN        
	FOX SARAH E     
 
Presentation 3: Comparison Between the 
      Traditional Junior High School and The Middle School      
	GOODWIN DEBRA A       
	HALEY TODD A
 
Presentation 4: History of the Middle 
      School      
	JOSEPH LYLA ANN       
	KIM ESTHER       
     
Presentation 5: Middle School Teaming: An Instructional and 
      Interdisciplinary Approach
	KOESTER GINA M        
	LANG ROBERT L    
     
Presentation 6:. The Teacher's Role in the Middle School
	LUTZ JENNIFER E       
	McCOY PHOINIX A   
    
Presentation 7: Curriculum Integration, 
      Exploratory Curriculum and Assessment in the Middle School
	McLAIN JACQUELINE M   
	MURPHY PATRICIA A  
   
Presentation 8: Cooperative Learning in the Middle School
	OVERMYER SARA A       
	RALPH SHELIA K   
     
Presentation 9: The Use of Classroom 
      Centers to Provide On-level Work for Students in the Middle School
	RAY RIKKI J           
	ROHRSCHEIB JENNIFER  
 
Presentation 10: The Effects of Turning Point 2000 on 
      Middle Level Education
	RUPLE HOLLY C         
	RUSH KENDRA LEA   
    

Presentation 11: The Importance of School and Classroom in the Environment of the Middle School Concept 

	RYAN MEGAN M          
	SIGLER KELLY JO  
     
Presentation 12: Drugs, Violence, and Crime in the Middle School
	STRANGE LINDA SUE     
	TOBIN KEVIN JOSEPH   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


G. Textbooks:cover of Teaching in the Middle School 1/e

A. Required Textbook:

Manning, M. L., & Bucher K. T. (2001). Teaching in the middle school. Columbus, OH: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

B. Other Resources

Capelluti, J. & Stokes, D. (Eds.). (2001). Middle level education: Programs, policies, & practices. Reston, VA: National Association of Secondary School Principals.

 

Content-area standards for educators. (2001). Springfield, IL: Illinois State Board of Education.

 

George, P. S., & Alexander, W. M. (2003). The exemplary middle school. (3rd Ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

 

George, P., Lawrence, G., & Bushnell, D. (1998). Handbook for middle school teaching. (2nd Ed.). New York: Longman.

 

Gracie, J.,  Spalding, E., & Powell, R. R. (2001). Contexts of teaching: Methods for middle and high school instruction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

 

Jackson, A. W., & Davis, G. A. (2000). Turning point 2000. New York: Teachers College Press.

 

Knowles, T., & Brown, D. F. (2000). What every middle school teacher should know. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

 

Lemlech, J. K. (2004). Teaching in elementary and secondary classrooms: Building a learning community. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

 

Marzano, R. J., (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E. (2001). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Muth, K. D., & Alvermann, D. E. (1999). Teaching and learning in the middle grades. (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

Ornstein, A. C. (2003). Pushing the envelope: Critical issues in education. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

 

Powell, S. D. (2005). Introduction to middle school. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

 

Stronge, J. H. (2002). Qualities of effective teachers. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

Walley, C. W., & Gerrick, W. G., (Eds.) (1999). Affirming middle grades education. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

Wiles, J., & Bondi, J. (2001). The new American middle school: Educating preadolescent in an era of change. (3rd Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

 

Yell, M. L., & Drasgow, E. (2005). No child left behind: A guide for professionals. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

 

"When you enjoy teaching students enjoy learning"

 

Word of encouragement:  This course is obviously intensive for we only meet 6 times when a typical 3 credit course meets approximately 36 times. However, you will succeed and you will benefit, IF you will plug along and take the "stress" in stride. Your grade is completely performance based and each of you are professional teachers and will succeed with patience, endurance, and aiming for high standards. Pace yourself and realize that the last day of class is already near! Just remember, Quondo Omni Flunkus Mortati (that is, When all else fails, play dead).